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Resigning from your Job

In this article, we will take you through all the essential steps on resigning from a job so that you leave professionally and on a positive note.

The first step of leaving a job is the penning of a resignation letter. Per Section 10(1) of the Employment Act, either party to an employment contract are entitled at any time to give the other party notice of his/her intention to terminate the contract. Employees have the right to resign; employers cannot reject or disallow employees from resigning. Employers who do so will be liable of an offence under section 108 of the Employment Act and may have to pay a fine of at least S$5,000 or to imprisonment for at least six months or to both.

However, unlike the employment contract which can be made verbally, the Ministry of Manpower states that a letter of termination or resignation must be made in writing. A resignation letter should include your desired date of resignation, the last day of employment, and the duration of which the notice period served, try to include some words of gratitude and appreciation for the opportunities that you have been given whilst in your employer’s employ. This will be helpful should you need any references for potential employment opportunities.

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Submit your resignation to your direct supervisor personally. MOM recommends that your employer signs your resignation letter to officially acknowledge receipt of your resignation. Once your resignation has been formally accepted, you will then start serving the mandatory notice period set out in your employment contract. If there is no mandatory notice period set out, the notice period will apply as follows:

  • If you have been employed for less than 26 weeks: 1 day’s notice
  • If you have been employed for at least 26 weeks and up to 2 years: 1 week’s notice
  • If you have been employed for at least two years and up to 5 years: 2 weeks’ notice
  • If you have been employed for at least five years: 4 weeks’ notice

It is important to note that if you do not wish to serve notice, you will be required to pay compensation in lieu of notice to your employer. However, your notice period may be waived should your employer and you both agree to do so. You may also offset your notice period by utilising annual leave; this will still count towards the fulfilment of the notice period. Employees under the Employment Act are also allowed to take sick leave during their notice period. Sick leave taken will not need to be replaced. Pregnant women should note that should they resign during their maternity leave; they will not be able to use their maternity leave to offset their notice period.

If you are serving notice, salary will be paid on the last day of employment; if you do not need to serve notice, salary will be paid one week after the last day of which you are employed.

Foreign workers must also bear in mind that employers will cancel their work permit within one week of their last day of employment.

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Our specialised lawyers and their team are standing by to assist you. Our first consultation is free.

The information contained within this website contains general information about our lawyers, Law Firm and procedures and is not intended to constitute legal advice.
Any person viewing or receiving information from this Website should not act or refrain from acting, on the basis of any such information without first seeking appropriate legal advice.
Please consult a lawyer for specific review of your case and advise. 

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